Chef Camp Recipe Sneak Peek: PINECONE SOURDOUGH STARTER

Wild Pine Cone Sourdough Starter from Ryan Stechschulte of Spoon and Stable. Photos by Becca Dilley

Wild Pine Cone Sourdough Starter from Ryan Stechschulte of Spoon and Stable.
Photos by Becca Dilley

Many of our favorite chefs and restaurants are constantly testing the limits of locally sourced ingredients. Chef Camp promises to take you directly to the source of inspiration and into the woods with local twin cities culinary gods. Think summer camp with a side of cooking school. Here you will find a sneak peek into their latest cook book and culinary adventure with Spoon and Stable's Ryan Stechschulte. Pick up a copy of this cook book for your chance to bring these recipes and stories home and into your kitchen.  


PINECONE SOURDOUGH STARTER
1. BASE RECIPE
100 grams wild yeast water 50 grams rye flour
50 grams all-purpose flour
This mix is the beginning of the bread culture. Mix thoroughly and keep in a container with
a lid. This is known as your “starter culture.”

2. FOR THE FIRST TWO WEEKS FEED IT EVERY DAY WITH:
100 grams starter culture 50 grams tap water
25 grams rye flour
25 grams all-purpose flour
This process should be repeated once a day at the same time
every day for 2 weeks. You will eventually see the starter culture become active. It will smell like bread or beer and it will begin to bubble. This is a good thing. It is coming alive. You will also notice that you are throwing away half of your starter with every feed. That is the starter that you use to bake bread. You can either use it or give it to a friend or increase the recipe to make enough starter to bake 100 loaves. The quantity is up to you.

3. AFTER TWO WEEKS,
STORE IN YOUR REFRIGERATOR AND FEED IT ONCE EVERY FIVE DAYS WITH:

100 grams starter culture 50 grams tap water
50 grams rye flour
50 grams all-purpose flour
During the retarding phase of the feed, I will change up my percentages a bit. This is merely a way to slow the production of the yeast and it keeps you from having to feed this starter culture every day.
Mix this in the same manner as any other feed. If you want to use the starter culture to bake bread from this point, simply take out your starter, allow it to come to room temperature and begin feeding it like normal. After 2 days, it should begin to become active again.

FOR A GOOD SOURDOUGH BREAD RECIPE, CHECK OUT:
cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016277-tartines-country-bread


Chef Camp is a northwoods food retreat that runs Sep 1-3, 2017 at YMCA Camp Miller, 90 minutes north of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Campers take wilderness-themed cooking classes over open fires from some of the most talented local chefs, sip artisan coffee and cocktails, participate in classic camp activities (think archery, canoeing, and crafts!) and feast under the stars in an open-air mess hall.

Because giving a Chef Camp ticket is so much more memorable than a pair of socks, the camp counselors are sweetening the deal this holiday season with discounted pre-sale prices starting of $600, which includes all food, beverages, lodging and activities. 

Through the end of the year, tickets will also come with a beautiful print copy of the 2016 Chef Camp cookbook. The cookbook includes recipes from last year's event, including: